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SAR ( Search And Rescue) Meanings Must You Know

Team SAR (Search And Rescue)

For those of you who don’t know SAR, SAR is a team that stands for Search and rescue where the task of the team is to try to find, evacuate to save someone who is missing and is worried about being hit by disasters such as shipping disasters, natural disasters and aviation disasters. Each country will certainly have its own SAR team to carry out important tasks in each of these countries.


The SAR team is not only assigned to the sea, debt, and mountain, but the SAR team is also assigned to urban areas such as a fire, collapse of a building, or a train accident. The SAR team can be said to be a team that plays an important role in finding casualties. However, most SAR teams operate when natural disasters occur. The personnel of this team also have the skills without endangering the victims or their personnel, so it can be said that this team is a solid and professional team.

Accident Warning Level Team SAR


In Indonesia, the SAR Team was formed under the name BNPP (National Search and Relief Agency) which has the task of carrying out searches for victims who have been affected by disaster or who are missing. The disaster warning level is also divided into three levels, namely:

  • Inserfa
    It is at this stage where the victims of aircraft or ship passengers begin to doubt their safety due to delays in arriving at their intended destination.
  • Alertfa
    This phase is a continuation of the inserfa level, where the victims begin to be threatened with safety.
  • Destresfa
    This phase is a continuation of the alertfa level where the victims need immediate assistance because the plane or ship they were traveling on had an accident such as burning, falling, or sinking.

The 5 stages of the Search for Victims Operation by the SAR Team

After the three warnings above have occurred, the SAR team has several stages of operations to respond to an accident that strikes, from the beginning it is known that an accident has occurred to how to handle it directly. The following are five stages of the operation to evacuate victims by the SAR team:

  • Awareness Stage
    This phase is where the SAR team members are aware / aware of the threat to the safety of the lives of passengers on the ship or plane. After that, communication will be made with the pilot or skipper first and find out the point of position.
  • Initial Action Stage

At this stage, the SAR team immediately investigates and finds out about the type of aircraft / ship, determines the type of accident that occurred, and conducts initial searches with PRECOM or NOTAM communication tools.

  • Planning Stage
    At this stage the SAR team arranged a search operation and provided a medical place if there were still survivors.
  • Operation Stage
    This stage is a continuation of the planning stage and direct operational practice that has been previously planned.
  • Conclution Stage
    At this stage all the victims have been found and the case is declared finished, and the teams return to their respective places by making reports during the investigation.

MRI Search and Rescue (SAR) Team

Commitment, Dedication, Compassion, Training…

Day or night, every day of the year, our volunteers are prepared to respond to the coastguard in order to prevent the loss of life.

It’s not always possible to prevent the loss of life but there is always a family on shore desperately waiting for word.

Incidents

Maritime Rescue Institute, Stonehaven

SEARCH AND RESCUE CALL OUT LOG No. 421

  1. Called out to search for overdue diver at Tod Head. Weather and sea conditions in the area were poor with strong NE winds and rain.

19.50 hrs.     Forth Coastguard requested MRI assist in search for a diver missing after a shore dive at Tod Head Lighthouse.

20.03 hrs.     MRI 42, with six crew on board, left Stonehaven

20.18 hrs.     MRI 42 arrived on scene Tod Head. MRI 42 commenced rock foot search Braidon Bay to Whistleberry. Auxiliary coastguard search teams commenced cliff and foreshore search of same area.

20.38 hrs.     Helicopter Rescue 137 arrived on scene and commenced shoreline search Tod Head to Little Johnshaven.

21.05 hrs.     Conditions on scene on rapidly deteriorated with very strong winds and torrential rain in darkness. MRI 42 extended its search area from Tod Head to Darn Bay.

22.15 hrs      Montrose RNLI Lifeboat arrived at southern end of search area and commenced search north to Whistleberry.

23.40 hrs.     Rescue 137 was released from search to refuel at Aberdeen airport.

23.50 hrs.     Aberdeen RNLI Lifeboat arrived on scene Tod Head to commence search to Little Johnshaven. 

00.00 hrs.     MRI 42 released from search to refresh crew.

00.10 hrs.     All SAR assets told to return to base as diver is confirmed safe ashore at Bervie.

00.30 hrs.     MRI 42 returned to station and refuelled.

00.45 hrs.     MRI 42 on station.

wind: ne 5-7 increasing 9 in heavy rain squalls , decreasing 4 e. sea state; rough – v rough.

weather: rain – torrential rain – clearing.

Philosophy of Mentions by the SAR Team

The SAR team also has several philosophical code words that have a meaning in each word. Here are some meaningful words used by the SAR Team:

  • Locate
    Locate means the concrete location of a place that is made a disaster point and is usually marked with latitude and longitude on the map.
  • Access
    Access means access from where assistance can be given to victims so they can reach the destination where the disaster occurred.
  • Stabilize
    Stabilize means the handling of victims, both survivors and those who died, which is carried out by the Rescue Unit before the medical aid arrives for further treatment.
  • Transport / Evacuation
    Evacuation means moving the victims from the scene of the incident to a safer place for data collection and to be given first aid by the medical team.

Well that’s interesting information about the SAR Team that you need to know as basic knowledge. If anything is unclear, you can ask through the comments column below and keep up with the updated information about the SAR Team in the World. That’s all we thank those of you who have read this article to the end.

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MRI SAR Youth Group

The MRI SAR Youth Group aims to develop Environmental Awareness, Safety awareness and Skills development and most importantly it’s Fun.

The MRI SAR Youth Group, is both an investment into the future of Kincardineshire lifeboat crew, and an effective route for raising awareness. The team undertake rescue training and work toward various national awards from Royal Yachting Association, John Muir Trust, Royal Lifesaving Society and Duke of Edinburgh organisations. It is important to have a significant fun element, but this can also build good water confidence and awareness. Day trips over and above normal club hours so far have included waterskiing, canoeing, surfing and diving. The team are very involved with fundraising efforts, both to further their own team, and to help MRI generally. In November the entire team slept out on the MRI 42 and raised £500 toward a winter boatbuilding programme.

It is vital that young people feel informed and empowered to promote safety messages in their own way, within their peer groups, particularly as there have been several teenage fatalities on the cliffs over the past few years. The ideas of the young people, are positively encouraged and supported. Their initiative and desire to spread safety messages has resulted in collaborations with a professional theatre group, art students, the local community safety group, poets and a sculptor, alongside lifeboat organisations, all within the first 6 months of this new dimension to MRI work. The benefits to the young people, MRI and the wider community have already proven enormous.

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MRI Advisory and Training Services

MRI has gained a worldwide reputation for the quality and methodology of its advisory training programme provision and is recognised by its peers as a world leader in its field.

Programmes available cover wide aspects of waterborne emergency response search and rescue, including:

  • Emergency response, search and rescue craft operation
  • Emergency response casualty care
  • Emergency response search and rescue craft and system maintenece
  • Riverine and confined waters emergency response and rescue
  • Operational area profiling
  • Operational environment craftmanship
  • Methodology of teaching
  • Instructor training

MRI provides these programmes either from its purpose built facility in Stonehaven, Scotland or within the end user’s local environment.

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MRI SAR Lifeboats

MRI Search and Rescue (SAR) Team Operates three Self Righting SAR Lifeboats:
MRI 24, MRI 28 and MRI 42.
The larger craft is mostly utilised for rescues away from the rock foot. The smaller crafts are specifically designed for inshore rescues.

Team work, safety and efficiency is the key to success in SAR Operations, and can only be achieved by an experienced and well trained team using fit for purpose equipment.

Funding of the SAR Team and its resources costs in the region of £50,000 per annum.

SAR Lifeboat – MRI 24

Length overall8.25 mPhoto of MRI 24
Beam overall2.5 m
Height overall
(lowest point of keep to top of mast)
2.75 m
Draft operational0.75 m 
Fuel capacity275 litres 
Engines2 Yamaha 90 hp petrol outboard

History of MRI 24

The ’24’ was originally built in 1978 as part of the joint research programme between Offshore Maritime Section (Robert Gordon’s Institute of Technology) and Ship Marine Technology Requirements Board (Department of Trade and Industry). It has a cold moulded 3 skin laminate wooden hull which allowed for the trials undertaken and ease of modification from this prototype. The MRI 24 was completely rebuilt as new in 2002

Speed

MRI 24 can operate to a service speed of 30 knots whilst at normal displacement in Douglas Sea State 2.

Endurance

Two fuel tanks carry sufficient fuel to give the craft an endurance of approximately 180 nautical miles or 6 hours duration at the service speed of 30 knots

Crew

4 persons

Survivor accommodation

2 stretcher cases plus 6 other persons. In an emergency, the craft can support 4 crew plus 12 other persons.

Navigational aids

VHF, Radar, GPS plotter. 2nd generation night vision available.

Emergency medical aid equipment

A full range of emergency medical aid equipment is carried onboard and crewmembers are suitably qualified in the provision of Advanced Medical Aid.

SAR Lifeboat – MRI 28

Length overall8.5 mPhoto of MRI 28
Beam overall2.75 m
Height overall
(lowest point of keep to top of mast)
3.25 m
Draft operational0.85 m
Fuel capacity425 litres 
Engines2 Steyr diesel inboard engines
Water jets2 Alamarin Jets

History of MRI 28

The ’28’ was built by MRI from a specialist Avon 8.5 hull form in 2003. She was put on station in January 2004.

Speed

MRI 28 can operate to a service speed of 30+ knots whilst at normal displacement in Douglas Sea State 2.

Endurance

Fuel tanks carry sufficient fuel to give the craft an endurance of approximately 180 nautical miles or 6 hours duration at the service speed of 30 knots

Crew

4 persons

Survivor accommodation

2 stretcher cases plus 6 other persons. In an emergency, the craft can support 4 crew plus 12 other persons.

Navigational aids

VHF, Radar, GPS plotter. 2nd generation night vision available.

Emergency medical aid equipment

A full range of emergency medical aid equipment is carried onboard and crewmembers are suitably qualified in the provision of Advanced Medical Aid.

SAR Lifeboat – MRI 42

Length overall12 mPhoto of MRI 42
Beam overall3.6 m
Height overall
(lowest point of keep to top of mast)
4.9 m
Draft operational1.33 m
Fuel capacity1000 litres
Engines2 Caterpillar 475 hp coupled to Hamilton water jet propulsion system

History of MRI 42

The ’42’ was originally built as one of the RNLI Medina project boats in1984 as a trial craft. MRI rediscovered her in 2000, lying in Liverpool and bought her. She was totally stripped, lengthened and rebuilt by Amble Boatyard to modern requirements and specification and re launched in October 2001.

Mr David Stogdon MBE was the boat designer and performed the naming ceremony on behalf of MRI on 31st October 2001. MRI 42 went to her first SAR call at Stonehaven on November 18th 2001.

Speed

MRI 42 can operate to a service speed of 25 knots whilst at normal displacement in Douglas Sea State 3.

Endurance

Fuel carried is sufficient to give an endurance of approximately 150 nautical miles or 6 hours duration at the service speed of 25 knots. Figures are estimated from engine manufacturer’s fuel consumption data allowing a 10% safety margin.

Crew

For SAR operations, the usual crew compliment will be 4.

Survivor accommodation

2 stretcher cases plus 12 other persons. In an emergency, the craft can support 4 crew plus 32 other persons.

Navigational aids

VHF, VHF DSc, GPS, Interphase Sonar, Radar & integrated chart works by Galileo, Navtex, FM USB SSB communications.

Emergency medical aid equipment

A full range of emergency medical aid equipment is carried onboard and crewmembers are suitably qualified in the provision of first aid.

Other emergency equipment

SOLAS packs, lifebuoys, pyrotechnics, liferaft, crane for recovering persons from the water, portable de-watering or fire pump.

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MRI Education and Awareness Programmes

MRI runs educational and awareness programmes for its own personnel as well as for external groups and organisations. MRI has developed a methodology of presentation for these programmes that both encourages and benefits from shared learning. The knowledge gained, shared and passed on transcends cultures, generations and the social scale.

MRI aims to promote and advance the education of the public in maritime rescue. We achieve this by:

  • Visiting groups – schools, local clubs
  • Using knowledge of others
  • Learning from other cultures
  • Addressing the loss of inherent lifeboat skills (fishermen)
  • MRI Youth Group
  • Education for young people, with characters Rory & Ropey

We encourage visits by schools and enjoy giving Talks and Demos to all kinds of Associations and Groups.

For further advice or information about the MRI education programmes, please contact MRI’s Education & Projects Officeenquiry.mri@btconnect.com or Tel. 01569 765668.

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MRI Schools

MRI has developed a programme of youth activities supporting its aim of public education and accident prevention in the waterborne environment.  The success and usefulness of the programmes already undertaken means that MRI is fully committed to the delivery of youth programmes in the future.

We can provide a programme for everything from Nursery to Secondary, for groups of 8 up to 60.

We are happy to work with schools to provide a programme that suits their particular needs, for example:

  • a curriculum linked geology field trip
  • children who are failing at school and need to learn alternative skills
  • a focus on enterprise, teambuilding, communications
  • nursery kids who need just the basic safety message …..

We will very soon be registered on Aberdeenshire Council’s Approved External Learning Providers list, and we have information sheets available on our standards and policies.

Please browse through the sections below explaining and illustrating some of our programmes. 

  • Why MRI wants to be involved with Youth Work;  Clients in 2005
  • MRI in Schools;  Sample Activities
  • Practical notes;  Cost
  • Feedback from Pupils and Schools
  • Gallery
  • Information sheets

For further advice or information about the MRI youth programmes, please contact MRI’s Education & Projects Office, ainger.scanlon@btconnect.com or Tel. 01569 765668.