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MRI SAR Lifeboats

MRI Search and Rescue (SAR) Team Operates three Self Righting SAR Lifeboats:
MRI 24, MRI 28 and MRI 42.
The larger craft is mostly utilised for rescues away from the rock foot. The smaller crafts are specifically designed for inshore rescues.

Team work, safety and efficiency is the key to success in SAR Operations, and can only be achieved by an experienced and well trained team using fit for purpose equipment.

Funding of the SAR Team and its resources costs in the region of £50,000 per annum.

SAR Lifeboat – MRI 24

Length overall8.25 mPhoto of MRI 24
Beam overall2.5 m
Height overall
(lowest point of keep to top of mast)
2.75 m
Draft operational0.75 m 
Fuel capacity275 litres 
Engines2 Yamaha 90 hp petrol outboard

History of MRI 24

The ’24’ was originally built in 1978 as part of the joint research programme between Offshore Maritime Section (Robert Gordon’s Institute of Technology) and Ship Marine Technology Requirements Board (Department of Trade and Industry). It has a cold moulded 3 skin laminate wooden hull which allowed for the trials undertaken and ease of modification from this prototype. The MRI 24 was completely rebuilt as new in 2002

Speed

MRI 24 can operate to a service speed of 30 knots whilst at normal displacement in Douglas Sea State 2.

Endurance

Two fuel tanks carry sufficient fuel to give the craft an endurance of approximately 180 nautical miles or 6 hours duration at the service speed of 30 knots

Crew

4 persons

Survivor accommodation

2 stretcher cases plus 6 other persons. In an emergency, the craft can support 4 crew plus 12 other persons.

Navigational aids

VHF, Radar, GPS plotter. 2nd generation night vision available.

Emergency medical aid equipment

A full range of emergency medical aid equipment is carried onboard and crewmembers are suitably qualified in the provision of Advanced Medical Aid.

SAR Lifeboat – MRI 28

Length overall8.5 mPhoto of MRI 28
Beam overall2.75 m
Height overall
(lowest point of keep to top of mast)
3.25 m
Draft operational0.85 m
Fuel capacity425 litres 
Engines2 Steyr diesel inboard engines
Water jets2 Alamarin Jets

History of MRI 28

The ’28’ was built by MRI from a specialist Avon 8.5 hull form in 2003. She was put on station in January 2004.

Speed

MRI 28 can operate to a service speed of 30+ knots whilst at normal displacement in Douglas Sea State 2.

Endurance

Fuel tanks carry sufficient fuel to give the craft an endurance of approximately 180 nautical miles or 6 hours duration at the service speed of 30 knots

Crew

4 persons

Survivor accommodation

2 stretcher cases plus 6 other persons. In an emergency, the craft can support 4 crew plus 12 other persons.

Navigational aids

VHF, Radar, GPS plotter. 2nd generation night vision available.

Emergency medical aid equipment

A full range of emergency medical aid equipment is carried onboard and crewmembers are suitably qualified in the provision of Advanced Medical Aid.

SAR Lifeboat – MRI 42

Length overall12 mPhoto of MRI 42
Beam overall3.6 m
Height overall
(lowest point of keep to top of mast)
4.9 m
Draft operational1.33 m
Fuel capacity1000 litres
Engines2 Caterpillar 475 hp coupled to Hamilton water jet propulsion system

History of MRI 42

The ’42’ was originally built as one of the RNLI Medina project boats in1984 as a trial craft. MRI rediscovered her in 2000, lying in Liverpool and bought her. She was totally stripped, lengthened and rebuilt by Amble Boatyard to modern requirements and specification and re launched in October 2001.

Mr David Stogdon MBE was the boat designer and performed the naming ceremony on behalf of MRI on 31st October 2001. MRI 42 went to her first SAR call at Stonehaven on November 18th 2001.

Speed

MRI 42 can operate to a service speed of 25 knots whilst at normal displacement in Douglas Sea State 3.

Endurance

Fuel carried is sufficient to give an endurance of approximately 150 nautical miles or 6 hours duration at the service speed of 25 knots. Figures are estimated from engine manufacturer’s fuel consumption data allowing a 10% safety margin.

Crew

For SAR operations, the usual crew compliment will be 4.

Survivor accommodation

2 stretcher cases plus 12 other persons. In an emergency, the craft can support 4 crew plus 32 other persons.

Navigational aids

VHF, VHF DSc, GPS, Interphase Sonar, Radar & integrated chart works by Galileo, Navtex, FM USB SSB communications.

Emergency medical aid equipment

A full range of emergency medical aid equipment is carried onboard and crewmembers are suitably qualified in the provision of first aid.

Other emergency equipment

SOLAS packs, lifebuoys, pyrotechnics, liferaft, crane for recovering persons from the water, portable de-watering or fire pump.